The Gallery at 249 A presents:

Bejeweled

a tribute to artist Paola Savarino

Reception: Friday September 8th, 6-8pm

savarino_1989_flowers_of_evil_72x72w.jpg

 

Gallery at 249 A Street  presents Bejeweled, a new exhibit of works by Paola Savarino, to honor her memory and legacy not only as a creative force, but also as an accomplished advocate for affordable live/work space for artists in the City of Boston. Sponsored by 249 A Street Artists Cooperative, Gallery East and the South Boston Community Development Foundation, the exhibit runs from Thursday, August 17 through Saturday, September 30. Gallery hours are by appointment at 617-416-0718. The show reception takes place on Friday, September 8, from 6 to 8 p.m. and is open to the public. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit and reception are FREE.

Bejeweled is co-curated by Duane Lucia and Tony Savarino, Paola’s son, and features 25 paintings never before shown. They are works in acrylic, oil and mixed media, including glass beads and coins. The pieces portray highly-textured, colorful and poetic images that dance on the canvas and energize the viewers’ senses.

“As a visual artist, much of Paola Savarino’s experience translates into visual expressions,” said Lucia. “Color, energy, symbols and surfaces are her means of exploring and understanding the world.”

Early in Savarino’s career, she illustrated Charles Bukowski’s poem, “The Genius of the Crowd.” In the 1980s, she became known for her large abstract canvases and, more recently, her encaustic mixed media Buddhas. She received numerous awards over the course of her career, including a Museum of Fine Arts Fifth Year Grant and an endowment from the WBZ-TV Fund for the Arts to create one of the first large arts projects—a billboard painting—in Fort Point. Her paintings are part of the permanent collection at The Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University.

Born in Cleveland, Savarino moved to Boston in 1970 to attend the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, where she would later go on to teach painting. As Boston’s Fort Point area—with its abandoned warehouses—became a destination for artists in the late 1970s, Savarino and others began working and living in the huge loft spaces despite the buildings being commercially zoned. They feared being caught, every knock on the door inducing panic and a scramble to hide signs of residence. That was no way to live.

In 1980, Savarino helped found Fort Point Arts Community (FPAC), which set on a course to find, re-zone, purchase and renovate buildings in which artists could afford to work and reside legally. The organization’s first success was the 249 A Street Artists Cooperative, where Savarino and her son took up residence along with 44 other artists. FPAC has since gone on to develop The Artist Building at 300 Summer Street and play an important role in establishing Midway Studios. Today, more than 300 artists live and work in Fort Point, and FPAC has become a model for artists’ organizations nationwide.

Paola Savarino passed away on March 8, 2017. Her son, Tony, said, “Paola treated everything and everyone she came in contact with like a rare and precious jewel.” It’s clear that her spirit, talent and kindness live on with her family, friends and the Boston artist community.

 

About the Gallery at 249 A

Gallery At 249 A features rotating art exhibitions and special arts events. The space is an evolving project of the 249 A Street Cooperative, one of Massachusetts’s first limited-equity live/work cooperative for artists. The building, which is home to more than 45 artists and their families, has served as a model for artists’ housing nationwide and was key in the growth of the Fort Point Arts Community (FPAC). Gallery At 249 A Street was the home of the FPAC Office for its first eleven years. The 249 A Street Cooperative celebrated its 30th anniversary with the opening of this new gallery space in September 2014.

The Gallery at 249 A is supported in part by a grant from the

South Boston Community Development Foundation.

Open by appointment. 

To schedule an appointment email: 249Agallery@gmail.com 

 

PREVIOUS EXHIBITIONS

FLOW

The Work of Lisa Knox and Kirk McNeil

July 6 through August 15, 2017

Reception: Thursday, July 20, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

Lisa Knox

Lisa Knox

 

“Flow” is a meditation on the sea with its ceaseless tides, waves, wind and weather. It is also a tribute to the complex intermixing of ideas and experiences between two artists who have been married for many years. The open-ended question presents itself; how do ideas “flow” from one person to the other and how is the vision of one artist influenced by the observations and opinions of the other? Within this framework the exhibit becomes an opportunity to examine the changing nature of two elemental forces in perpetual flux: the ocean and love.

Kirk and Lisa have shared a studio in the 249 A Street Artists Cooperative in Boston for over 20 years. Their free time is spent wandering the shores of New England in a 1963 Ford Ranchero in search of inspiration and subject matter for their work.

Kirk McNeil

In his current work Kirk is searching for small, quiet events on and near the water.  Waiting for the moment when the effects of light, wind and tide coalesce, transforming the way we perceive the natural world. The images are created using old favorite lenses with a digital acquisition format.  The goal is to make a piece of digital art without heavy digital influence.   

Lisa’s Knox

Lisa’s paintings are inspired by the mesmeric quality of wave-forms. Each painting is like a window looking out to the sea where the viewer can channel their mind. Gestural line, grids and broad planes of color emerge and dissolve echoing the ever-changing nature of the sea. By layering seemingly disparate elements Knox suggests that the deeper mysteries lay submerged beneath the oceans surface, where the underlying forces and patterns aren’t immediately apparent.

About the artists

Lisa Knox lives and works in Boston’s Fort Point neighborhood. Her work has been exhibited throughout America and internationally. Knox has shown in numerous art fairs, with the ISE Cultural Center in New York and the Wills Gallery in London. Her work can be found in American and international private collections.

Kirk McNeil worked for many years as a television photojournalist and editor.  He has earned an Emmy Award along with awards from the National Press Photographers Association.  His video and still photography have been exhibited throughout the greater Boston area.

 

 


 

 

 

Men, the invitational

 group show curated by Steven Muller

featuring works by:

Domingo Barreres,  Steven Muller, Robert Siegelman, George Summers JR,  Mark Younkle

 

Opening reception Tuesday June 6th


 

The DNA: Visual Exercises

Martin Berinstein

Sofia Berinstein

April 2 - May 15, 2017

Opening Reception: Friday April 7, 6:15-8:00p 249 A Street Boston, Massachusetts

 

Winter Landscapes of Northern New England

Over the years, father and daughter have been traveling around Northern New England at the peak of winter, each time viewing the same new landscapes through their own, different perspectives.

This is the selection of images collected over those journeys, visual exercises in the connection between photographer and landscape. In virtue of a constant variable, they show the differences in related eyes.

Martin Berinstein (the father) is a professional photographer who has been practicing for 40 years. His work abstractly depicts the motion of water and color, involving the audience in awe, reflection, and play. He has exhibited widely in the Boston area, including the Boston Convention Center, Northeastern University, as well as internationally. Sofia Berinstein (the daughter) practices photography and philosophy. She has exhibited at Cooper Union, MIT, and in a variety of group exhibitions in New York and Boston. Her work concerns the nature of perspectives representation and the relationship of ideas to objects.

 

 


Eli Alperowicz: Politics Life and Death

February 17 - March 27, 2017

Opening Reception Friday March 3, 6:00-8:00p

"In response to the disturbing political campaign which culminated in the election of the current " president “ that remind me more than anything of  the political campaigns of dictators current and past, the images I created in the last two years seems to be all coming together pointing to the direction the Donald is taking the country.

Using paper as preferred surface or cardboard or unframed  canvases was my way of conveying a message not of  beauty, but of concern and alarm." -Eli Alperowicz


all photographs above: Don Eyles

see more at doneyles.com


 

 

 

The Colors of Nature: Dorothy Hebden Heath & Caroline Muir

December 1-January 5

Opening reception: Thursday December 15, 6-8p

Dorothy Hebden Heath

Dorothy Hebden Heath

Caroline Muir

Caroline Muir


 


WE'RE BACK

Marilyn Tarlow & Bill Tarlow

Paintings and Drawings by Marilyn Tarlow and photographs by Bill Tarlow

May 4 - 28, 2016

Opening Reception: Saturday May 7th,  2-4pm


Elaine Buckholtz

The Ruin of Nostalgia ( a day into night light installation )

April 2-28, 2016
Opening Reception: Wednesday April 6, 5:30-7:30

 A visual exploration into the ruptured collisions of memory and the weathering of objects as they are sustained and changed through light, space, and time.
  
"All matter is spent light." Louis Kahn

About the artist
Elaine Buckholtz is an installation artist with a background in lighting design and music. Her work explores the medium of light as both an ephemeral phenomenon and as an intervention to unmask hidden aspects of architectural forms found in urban settings and landscapes. She has most recently shown works at The Lumiere Festival, London, England and Derry Ireland, Souzy Tros, Athens Greece, Back Yard Stories, Batumi, Georgia, Electric Works Gallery, The Luggage Store Gallery in S.F., and Sasha Wolf Gallery in New York. Elaine has also worked with Meredith Monk over the past fifteen years lighting Monk’s work internationally. She is currently a professor at Massachusetts College of Art and Design in the Studio For Interrelated Media.

more about Elaine on her website here


 

Domingo Barreres: Paintings, Drawings and Prints with Lingering Vibrations from Spain

February 22—March 28, 2016

Opening Reception: Saturday February 27, 6-8p

Artists Talk: Thursday March 10, 6p

 

Some (many) say that painting is no longer relevant in the 21st century because it has exhausted all it could do during its long, long history. It is a convincing proposition and they may have a point. But the challenge is so good, so tempting. So at the dawn of the 21st century I thought I would like to try to make paintings that elicit the sense of awe that has been painting’s traditional pedigree.”

-Domingo Barreres

Anachon, Domingo Barreres

Anachon, Domingo Barreres

 

Domingo Barreres is one of the founding members of the 249 A Street Cooperative and one of the pioneering artists who first found studio space in Fort Point. Born in Spain, he came to the US in 1957 and arrived in Boston in 1960 to study at SMFA, where he later taught until his retirement in 2006. Barreres exhibits his work locally and internationally. In Boston, he is represented by Miller/Yezerski Gallery.

“During my youth in Spain in the 1940s and 1950s, I absorbed the culture’s unique mixture of the spiritual and profane. Once living permanently in the USA, my adult analytical disposition was able to appreciate the clashing cultural contrasts made even more poignant by the privilege of distance.

During my late 50s, a visit to southern Spain compelled me to explore certain issues for which I had no form – as yet. And from the early years of this millennium academic figuration would insert a parenthesis within my preferred approach to metaphor through abstraction.

The works in this exhibition fall somewhere in the middle of this exploration using a figurative format and are influenced by another visit to Spain, this time to El Prado Museum in Madrid, home to the enigmatic painting LAS MENINAS by Diego Velazquez, as well as other, innumerable, fascinating visual and intellectual treats.”

Ambition, Domingo Barreres

Ambition, Domingo Barreres


Dogs

 Don Eyles

 Don Eyles

January 7 - February 19, 2016

Reception: January 21, 5-7pm

That artists love dogs seems obvious. Their poses and behaviors inspire us to take up brush or pencil or camera. Their cheerful openness to new experience sets an example for us to follow, if we can, and behind their eyes we sense a different kind of logic that, as we try to understand it, enlarges our own awareness.

artists:

Dirk Ahlgrim
Jennifer Amadeo-Holl
Domingo Barreres
Bebe Beard
Stephanie Berlo
Nyx Breen
Brian Bresnahan
Leah Davies
Claire Eder
Don Eyles (organizer)
Yetti Frenkel
Kippy Goldfarb
Dorothy Hebden
Lisa Knox
Amy MacDonald
Karen McFeaters
Kirk McNeil
Carla Michel
Dan Osterman
Heather Parker
Bruce Rogovin
Jose Santos
Sylvia Stagg-Giuliano
Lenore Tenenblatt
Nick Thorkelson
Daniel van Ackere

shown above: photographic installation by Don Eyles